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Cold Damage


Disclaimer:
The values below are totally off the top of my head.... If someone out there has better values I'll be happy to use them. Hopefully I'll come up with a more efficient way of dealing with this in the future, but for now this is what I've got. I hope it helps the people who've asked for this!


Cold Contact Tissue Damage

Cold objects in direct contact with human tissue can cause damage as the body's fluids freeze; this effect is known as frostbite. Cell damage can result, as well as permanent vascular damage. Mild cases may manifest as inflammation of the affected skin accompanied by slight pain; severe cases can exhibit severe tissue damage with little to no pain. Frostbitten tissue is highly susceptible to infection and even gangrene.

Damage inflicted by a cold object depends on that object's temperature and heat conductivity, as well as the area exposed and time of exposure. Light solids like wood and plastic will conduct heat from the body less efficiently than dense solids like metal and rock. Assuming 10 square inches of bare skin contact:

Temperature of Object
30 F
15 F
0 F
-25 F
-50 F
-75 F
-100 F
-150 F
-200 F

Gas / Air
1D4 per hour
1D4 per hour
1D4 per 15 minutes
1D4 per 5 minutes
1D4 per 2 minutes
1D4 per minute
1D4 per 30 seconds
1D4 per melee
1D6 per melee

Liquid
2D4 per hour
2D4 per hour
2D4 per 15 minutes
2D4 per 5 minutes
2D4 per 2 minutes
2D4 per minute
2D4 per 30 seconds
2D4 per melee
2D6 per melee

Light Solid
1D6 per hour
1D6 per hour
1D6 per 15 minutes
1D6 per 5 minutes
1D6 per 2 minutes
1D6 per minute
1D6 per 30 seconds
1D6 per melee
3D4 per melee

Dense Solid
2D6 per hour
2D6 per hour
2D6 per 15 minutes
2D6 per 5 minutes
2D6 per 2 minutes
2D6 per minute
2D6 per 30 seconds
2D6 per melee
3D6 per melee

Hypothermia

Extended exposure to cold atmospheric temperatures can lower the body's core temperature, limiting bloodflow to extremities and causing tissue damage. Treating hypothermia requires gradual increase of body temperature; serious cases require medical supervision and equipment, including CPR. Assuming that the body's glucose levels are sufficient, shivering can increase core temperature by about 3 F per hour. Fluid levels and raw calorie intake are very important, both needed for the body to produce heat. Victims should avoid diuretics like alcohol and caffeine and stimulants including tobacco/nicotine.

The amount of time spent exposed in certain temperatures is proportional to the severity of the effects. Anyone exposed to cold temperatures should stay as dry as possible, as water conducts heat much faster than air, decreasing the time required for effects to set in on a wet person by a factor of five. Sustained contact with metal is even worse, decreasing the time by up to another factor of five! These times assume only mild protection from the cold; Insulating clothing can greatly increase these times:

Air Temperature
40 F
20 F
0 F
-25 F
-50 F
-75 F

Mild
6D6x10 minutes
3D6x10 minutes
1D6x10 minutes
1D4x10 minutes
5D6 minutes
3D6 minutes

Moderate
2D6 hours
2D4 hours
6D6x10 minutes
4D6x10 minutes
2D6x10 minutes
1D6x10 minutes

Severe
4D6 hours
2D6 hours
2D4 hours
6D6x10 minutes
4D6x10 minutes
2D6x10 minutes

Deadly
6D6 hours
4D6 hours
2D6 hours
2D4 hours
6D6x10 minutes
4D6x10 minutes